Essay On Relation And Uses Of Maths In Other Subjects

much of the data we need in Japan are simply not available because the Japanese marketplace is less well developed than in the U.S. Drivers' license data, income data, lifestyle data, are all commonplace here and unavailable there. There is little prior penetration in either country by American retailers, so there is no experience we can draw upon. We have all heard how difficult it will be to open up sales operations in Japan, but recent sales trends among computer sellers and auto parts sales hint at an easing of the difficulties.

"The plan is to open three stores a year, 5,000 square feet each. We expect to do $700/square foot, which is more than double the experience of American retailers in the U.S. but 45% less than our stores. In addition, pricing will be 20% higher to offset the cost of land and buildings. Asset costs are approximately twice their rate in the U.S., but labor is slightly less. Benefits are more thoroughly covered by the government. Of course, there is a lot of uncertainty in the sales volumes we are planning. The pricing will cover some of the uncertainty but is still less than comparable quality goods already being offered in Japan.

"Let me shift over to the competition and tell you what we have learned. We have established long-term relationships with 500 to 1000 families in each country. This is comparable to our practice in the U.S. These families do not know they are working specifically with our company, as this would skew their reporting. They keep us appraised of their catalog and shopping experiences, regardless of the company they purchase from. The sample size is large enough to be significant, but, of course, you have to be careful about small differences.

"All the families receive our catalog and catalogs from several of our competitors. They match the lifestyle, income, and education demographic profiles of the people we want to have as customers. They are experienced catalog shoppers, and this will skew their feedback as compared to new catalog shoppers.

"One competitor is sending one 100-page catalog per quarter. The product line is quite narrow—200 products out of a domestic line of 3,000. They have selected items that are not likely to pose fit problems: primarily outerwear and knit shirts, not many pants, mostly men's goods, not women's. Their catalog copy is in Kanji, but the style is a bit stilted we are told, probably because it was written in English and translated, but we need to test this hypothesis. By contrast, we have simply mailed them the same catalog we use in the U.S., even written in English.

"Customer feedback has been quite clear. They prefer our broader assortment by a ratio of 3:1, even though they don't buy most of the products. As the competitors figured, sales are focused on outerwear and knits, but we are getting more sales, apparently because they like looking at the catalog and spend more time with it. Again, we need further testing. Another hypothesis is that our brand name is simply better known.

"Interestingly, they prefer our English-language version because they find it more of an adventure to read the catalog in another language. This is probably

The Use of Mathematics in the Medical Field Essay

853 Words4 Pages

The medical field is a very interesting career field. There are hundreds of different occupations within this field, including anything from saving a fragile newborn baby’s life to prescribing antibiotics to a relatively healthy adult. No two occupations are exactly alike, but each one is equally important. Although there are several job variations in medicine, they all have at least one thing in common. Every occupation within the medical field relies heavily on mathematics. Elementary mathematics, geometry and algebra are all obviously crucial to advancing in new technology, saving lives and curing diseases. However, most people do not realize the importance math has on simpler tasks performed every day by doctors, nurses, x-ray…show more content…

Similarly to doctors and pharmacists, nurses also rely on the metric system and are required to convert measurements quickly. Many nurses deal with this daily through calculating IV drip rates. Most IV bags contain one thousand cubic centimeters of fluid. A doctor may order his/her nurse to administer one thousand cubic centimeters every 8 hours. This may not seem too difficult, but in order to do this a nurse has to precisely calculate the drip rate of the machine so that the patient gets the required amount of medication in the time frame the doctor suggests. In contrast, a smaller bag of IV fluid may require instruction to give a patient five hundred milligrams every thirty minutes (Boyd). Before calculating the drip rate of the small bag, a nurse would have to convert the original cubic centimeters to milligrams. Just as important as conversions, ratios and proportions also play a huge role in the medical field. Nurses use ratios and proportions when giving medication based on their patient’s weight and height. A doctor may give the order 25 mcg/kg/min. If a patient weighs 114 pounds, how many milligrams of medication should he/she be given per hour? To figure this, his/her nurse would begin by changing micrograms into milligrams. If one microgram is equal to 0.001 milligrams, the nurse can find the amount of milligrams in twenty-five micrograms by setting up a

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