Research Papers On Tissue Culture

Soilless system exhibited higher yield (total and marketable), growth, nutrient accumulation compared with those grown in soil. Among soilless system jute fiber led to higher yield and good fruit quality compare to other substrates. The... more

Soilless system exhibited higher yield (total and marketable), growth, nutrient accumulation compared with those grown in soil. Among soilless system jute fiber led to higher yield and good fruit quality compare to other substrates. The highest marketable fresh weight was observed in jute fiber, followed by coco fiber while the lowest yield was recorded in soil with a reduction of 22% compared to sales treatments. In soilless culture fruit ascorbic acid and protein content were high with 31 and 71% respectively compared to soil treatment. The concentration of glucose, fructose and sucrose were significantly higher by 25, 32,114% respectively in soilless treatments than in soil. The concentration of N and Mg in leaves, stem, fruits, and flowers were significantly higher in soilless compared to soil. Flowers, leaves, fruit and stem of plants under jute fiber treatments shows highest concentration of K and P was significantly higher in soil than soilless treatments. The micronutrient concentrations (Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn) of plants grown in soilless treatment were generally higher than those grown on soil in the different plant tissues. The growth, yield, fruit quality and nutrient uptake was much more satisfactory on plant growing under media using jute fiber, than the other media. With controlled nutrient supply, less expense, less labor, no use of pesticides or fertilizer with the controlled environment the use soilless system with jute fiber can be an effective one for growing squash over conventional soil culture. Our results also showed that soilless culture can improve yield (total, marketable fruit) fruit quality of zucchini squash in comparison with soil culture.

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